The Autopsy of Jane Doe, 2016 – ★★★

Effective, low-budget, one location, three-location horror film which unfortunately drops the ball in the third half, and then earns “the finger” with the final shot. (NO! Don’t do it…ahhhhh, you did. Shame.)

On the other hand, and in it’s favor, is there any other horror film that has a father-son relationship at its core that isn’t antagonistic? Nice economy of dialog and acting situate the two male leads early on, and the reveal of “Jane Doe” in dirt has something very primordial to it.

COULD have been good, but a whole bunch of poor and/or mediocre choices follow. Ah well.

Vía Letterboxd – Ted Mills

The Autopsy of Jane Doe, 2016 – ★★★

Effective, low-budget, one location, three-location horror film which unfortunately drops the ball in the third half, and then earns “the finger” with the final shot. (NO! Don’t do it…ahhhhh, you did. Shame.)

On the other hand, and in it’s favor, is there any other horror film that has a father-son relationship at its core that isn’t antagonistic? Nice economy of dialog and acting situate the two male leads early on, and the reveal of “Jane Doe” in dirt has something very primordial to it.

COULD have been good, but a whole bunch of poor and/or mediocre choices follow. Ah well.

Vía Letterboxd – Ted Mills

The Autopsy of Jane Doe, 2016 – ★★★

Effective, low-budget, one location, three-location horror film which unfortunately drops the ball in the third half, and then earns “the finger” with the final shot. (NO! Don’t do it…ahhhhh, you did. Shame.)

On the other hand, and in it’s favor, is there any other horror film that has a father-son relationship at its core that isn’t antagonistic? Nice economy of dialog and acting situate the two male leads early on, and the reveal of “Jane Doe” in dirt has something very primordial to it.

COULD have been good, but a whole bunch of poor and/or mediocre choices follow. Ah well.

Vía Letterboxd – Ted Mills

The Autopsy of Jane Doe, 2016 – ★★★

Effective, low-budget, one location, three-location horror film which unfortunately drops the ball in the third half, and then earns “the finger” with the final shot. (NO! Don’t do it…ahhhhh, you did. Shame.)

On the other hand, and in it’s favor, is there any other horror film that has a father-son relationship at its core that isn’t antagonistic? Nice economy of dialog and acting situate the two male leads early on, and the reveal of “Jane Doe” in dirt has something very primordial to it.

COULD have been good, but a whole bunch of poor and/or mediocre choices follow. Ah well.

Vía Letterboxd – Ted Mills

Filmworker, 2017 – ★★★½

Your reaction to this documentary will tie in, I guess, with how you feel about “genius”, about those who undoubtedly are, but also are tyrants in their own way. Would you give anything to work for a genius like Kubrick? Because Leon Vitali did, and it quite literally sucked the life out of him as witnessed by his current appearance in this film. Devoted to Vitali’s career as Kubrick’s right-hand (arm/appendage) man, Vitali gave over his life to working for the director. I was surprised that he managed to court, marry, and have kids in this time, but maybe that’s the editing of this doc. It is shameful the way he was treated when LACMA mounted their exhibition on Kubrick, but Vitali holds no grudges, so what can I say?

Vía Letterboxd – Ted Mills

Personal Shopper, 2016 – ★★★½ (contains spoilers)

This review may contain spoilers.

It’s as if Assayas took the mood of the final 10 minutes of “Clouds of Sils Maria” and kept Stewart’s character on. A film about wandering around rootless in grief, Stewart’s Maureen is like a ghost herself: buying clothes for a celebrity she never sees, engaging in sexual/stalkery games with a mysterious texter, inhabiting rooms that are not her own, but finding no solace at home either. She talks earlier about being a medium and how it’s often like looking through the crack of a door…in a film that has numerous mysterious doors, including one that feels positively Lynchian in its menace. Even the ending, which promises human connection as last, eludes Maureen that which she desires. Great stuff. Stewart is perfect for these haunted roles.

Vía Letterboxd – Ted Mills

Personal Shopper, 2016 – ★★★½ (contains spoilers)

This review may contain spoilers.

It’s as if Assayas took the mood of the final 10 minutes of “Clouds of Sils Maria” and kept Stewart’s character on. A film about wandering around rootless in grief, Stewart’s Maureen is like a ghost herself: buying clothes for a celebrity she never sees, engaging in sexual/stalkery games with a mysterious texter, inhabiting rooms that are not her own, but finding no solace at home either. She talks earlier about being a medium and how it’s often like looking through the crack of a door…in a film that has numerous mysterious doors, including one that feels positively Lynchian in its menace. Even the ending, which promises human connection as last, eludes Maureen that which she desires. Great stuff. Stewart is perfect for these haunted roles.

Vía Letterboxd – Ted Mills

Personal Shopper, 2016 – ★★★½ (contains spoilers)

This review may contain spoilers.

It’s as if Assayas took the mood of the final 10 minutes of “Clouds of Sils Maria” and kept Stewart’s character on. A film about wandering around rootless in grief, Stewart’s Maureen is like a ghost herself: buying clothes for a celebrity she never sees, engaging in sexual/stalkery games with a mysterious texter, inhabiting rooms that are not her own, but finding no solace at home either. She talks earlier about being a medium and how it’s often like looking through the crack of a door…in a film that has numerous mysterious doors, including one that feels positively Lynchian in its menace. Even the ending, which promises human connection as last, eludes Maureen that which she desires. Great stuff. Stewart is perfect for these haunted roles.

Vía Letterboxd – Ted Mills

You Were Never Really Here, 2017 – ★★★½

A grimy, ultimately *too* claustrophobic Taxi Driver-esque portrayal of a suicidal hitman who gets more than he bargained for when hired to rescue a young girl from a child-sex ring. Everybody in this film is traumatized, and we soon figure out that the weapon-of-choice of “Joe” (Joaquin Phoenix, scarred and paunchy in body) is tied in to his own childhood. (This gets reworked near the end, suggesting that trauma has been passed down but in a different way.)

It’s shocking, it will make you jump, but Ramsey clevely does a lot of the brutal violence off-screen, not that you notice this while watching. I would have liked to have spent a little longer with some of these characters–a lot happens wordlessly–but this is how Ramsey chose to do it.

Great score by Jonny Greenwood, too.

Vía Letterboxd – Ted Mills

You Were Never Really Here, 2017 – ★★★½

A grimy, ultimately *too* claustrophobic Taxi Driver-esque portrayal of a suicidal hitman who gets more than he bargained for when hired to rescue a young girl from a child-sex ring. Everybody in this film is traumatized, and we soon figure out that the weapon-of-choice of “Joe” (Joaquin Phoenix, scarred and paunchy in body) is tied in to his own childhood. (This gets reworked near the end, suggesting that trauma has been passed down but in a different way.)

It’s shocking, it will make you jump, but Ramsey clevely does a lot of the brutal violence off-screen, not that you notice this while watching. I would have liked to have spent a little longer with some of these characters–a lot happens wordlessly–but this is how Ramsey chose to do it.

Great score by Jonny Greenwood, too.

Vía Letterboxd – Ted Mills