Spring, 2014 – ★★★★

Backtracked from The Endless to finally watch this other Benson&Moorhead film. (Should they ever leave the film biz, they should open a bespoke tailor shoppe.) Again flaunting genre, they bring together “Before Sunrise” and Zulawski’s “Possession” and come out with a film that acts as a metaphor for falling in love (and commitment) while being just an odd love story. B&M also like to tell similar tales: all three are about a man fleeing after a crisis point and traveling to a new and strange land where their troubles come back in new and interesting shapes. Psychologically, they emerge as different, usually better people, which is why despite the trappings of horror, these aren’t horror films.

This movie could have gone south so many times, but it’s held up by its two sturdy leads, who just live their characters. You will understand why, when the inevitable discovery scene happens, Evan is conflicted and compassionate.

Contains some absolutely beautiful scenes, including that slow-motion walk through the piazza where Evan sees Louise for the first time, it’s so casual it might be verite, but it’s also subtly choreographed. A sublime mix of beauty and horror.

Now having watched all three main B&M films, I feel they are the real freakin’ deal.

Vía Letterboxd – Ted Mills

Spring, 2014 – ★★★★

Backtracked from The Endless to finally watch this other Benson&Moorhead film. (Should they ever leave the film biz, they should open a bespoke tailor shoppe.) Again flaunting genre, they bring together “Before Sunrise” and Zulawski’s “Possession” and come out with a film that acts as a metaphor for falling in love (and commitment) while being just an odd love story. B&M also like to tell similar tales: all three are about a man fleeing after a crisis point and traveling to a new and strange land where their troubles come back in new and interesting shapes. Psychologically, they emerge as different, usually better people, which is why despite the trappings of horror, these aren’t horror films.

This movie could have gone south so many times, but it’s held up by its two sturdy leads, who just live their characters. You will understand why, when the inevitable discovery scene happens, Evan is conflicted and compassionate.

Contains some absolutely beautiful scenes, including that slow-motion walk through the piazza where Evan sees Louise for the first time, it’s so casual it might be verite, but it’s also subtly choreographed. A sublime mix of beauty and horror.

Now having watched all three main B&M films, I feel they are the real freakin’ deal.

Vía Letterboxd – Ted Mills

Spring, 2014 – ★★★★

Backtracked from The Endless to finally watch this other Benson&Moorhead film. (Should they ever leave the film biz, they should open a bespoke tailor shoppe.) Again flaunting genre, they bring together “Before Sunrise” and Zulawski’s “Possession” and come out with a film that acts as a metaphor for falling in love (and commitment) while being just an odd love story. B&M also like to tell similar tales: all three are about a man fleeing after a crisis point and traveling to a new and strange land where their troubles come back in new and interesting shapes. Psychologically, they emerge as different, usually better people, which is why despite the trappings of horror, these aren’t horror films.

This movie could have gone south so many times, but it’s held up by its two sturdy leads, who just live their characters. You will understand why, when the inevitable discovery scene happens, Evan is conflicted and compassionate.

Contains some absolutely beautiful scenes, including that slow-motion walk through the piazza where Evan sees Louise for the first time, it’s so casual it might be verite, but it’s also subtly choreographed. A sublime mix of beauty and horror.

Now having watched all three main B&M films, I feel they are the real freakin’ deal.

Vía Letterboxd – Ted Mills

The Endless, 2017 – ★★★★

So glad Benson and Moorhead returned to the spooky California backcountry of “Resolution,” but I had no idea by how much! As somebody else said, their films are kinda…horror movies, but they don’t arc or play out like that genre. They are unique films, filled with unease alongside big philosophical questions. The question that really stuck with me I don’t want to say because it’s a spoiler, but really questions our love of narrative and repetition in genre. Moments in this film are like strange dreams–like the rope challenge, the rules of which make no sense but everybody understands.
Yes, they could do with a bigger budget, but if it means these two don’t get to make exactly the film they want, what’s the point? Haven’t watched “Spring” yet–is it streaming anywhere?–but by gum I’m on it.

Vía Letterboxd – Ted Mills

Yellow Submarine, 1968 – ★★★★½

Docked half a star because the inventiveness peters out in the end, and how the “battle of Pepperland” is just not as headtrippy as the previous 3/4 of the film. Still, when you read up on the making of the film–seen as a risky investment, very little budget, no time, and an animators strike half-way through production–it’s stunning how timeless it all seems now.

On top of the Pushpin-style cel animation, we also get:
Pre-Gilliam cutout animation
Looped photo figures that both look backwards at Muybridge and forward to our love of animated gifs
Op Art
Flicker film (a la 1966’s Tony Conrad)
Abstract rotoscoping (in the Lucy sequence)
pre-Sesame Street Numbers animation

There’s no way today such an important intellectual property as “The Beatles” would be taken on by a company flying by the seat of its pants and just bunging everything in, mostly without a plot. Yet, here it is, a masterpiece.

(Seen on its 50th anniversary tour on the big screen, so crisp that I could see the shadows of the cel animation on the background)

Vía Letterboxd – Ted Mills

Yellow Submarine, 1968 – ★★★★½

Docked half a star because the inventiveness peters out in the end, and how the “battle of Pepperland” is just not as headtrippy as the previous 3/4 of the film. Still, when you read up on the making of the film–seen as a risky investment, very little budget, no time, and an animators strike half-way through production–it’s stunning how timeless it all seems now.

On top of the Pushpin-style cel animation, we also get:
Pre-Gilliam cutout animation
Looped photo figures that both look backwards at Muybridge and forward to our love of animated gifs
Op Art
Flicker film (a la 1966’s Tony Conrad)
Abstract rotoscoping (in the Lucy sequence)
pre-Sesame Street Numbers animation

There’s no way today such an important intellectual property as “The Beatles” would be taken on by a company flying by the seat of its pants and just bunging everything in, mostly without a plot. Yet, here it is, a masterpiece.

(Seen on its 50th anniversary tour on the big screen, so crisp that I could see the shadows of the cel animation on the background)

Vía Letterboxd – Ted Mills

Yellow Submarine, 1968 – ★★★★½

Docked half a star because the inventiveness peters out in the end, and how the “battle of Pepperland” is just not as headtrippy as the previous 3/4 of the film. Still, when you read up on the making of the film–seen as a risky investment, very little budget, no time, and an animators strike half-way through production–it’s stunning how timeless it all seems now.

On top of the Pushpin-style cel animation, we also get:
Pre-Gilliam cutout animation
Looped photo figures that both look backwards at Muybridge and forward to our love of animated gifs
Op Art
Flicker film (a la 1966’s Tony Conrad)
Abstract rotoscoping (in the Lucy sequence)
pre-Sesame Street Numbers animation

There’s no way today such an important intellectual property as “The Beatles” would be taken on by a company flying by the seat of its pants and just bunging everything in, mostly without a plot. Yet, here it is, a masterpiece.

(Seen on its 50th anniversary tour on the big screen, so crisp that I could see the shadows of the cel animation on the background)

Vía Letterboxd – Ted Mills

Yellow Submarine, 1968 – ★★★★½

Docked half a star because the inventiveness peters out in the end, and how the “battle of Pepperland” is just not as headtrippy as the previous 3/4 of the film. Still, when you read up on the making of the film–seen as a risky investment, very little budget, no time, and an animators strike half-way through production–it’s stunning how timeless it all seems now.

On top of the Pushpin-style cel animation, we also get:
Pre-Gilliam cutout animation
Looped photo figures that both look backwards at Muybridge and forward to our love of animated gifs
Op Art
Flicker film (a la 1966’s Tony Conrad)
Abstract rotoscoping (in the Lucy sequence)
pre-Sesame Street Numbers animation

There’s no way today such an important intellectual property as “The Beatles” would be taken on by a company flying by the seat of its pants and just bunging everything in, mostly without a plot. Yet, here it is, a masterpiece.

(Seen on its 50th anniversary tour on the big screen, so crisp that I could see the shadows of the cel animation on the background)

Vía Letterboxd – Ted Mills

Wallace & Gromit: The Curse of the Were-Rabbit, 2005 – ★★★★½

I *thought* I had seen this one, but delightfully not, as I discovered sitting down with friends for an outdoor screening here in S.B. Packed to the gills with puns, visual comedy, fantastic character animation (esp. Lady Tottington), and that grand British tradition of upturning Hollywood genres and plonking them down in the most provincial of settings. A lot of live action directors could take lessons from this film about how to convey complex information and ratchet up suspense without dialog.

Would make a great double bill with Edgar Wright’s “Hot Fuzz” because of the similiar genre/setting and directing style.

Vía Letterboxd – Ted Mills